Very rare Michael and Lisa-Marie portrait set to be auctioned soon



by Allforlove

October 18, 2010


"The Lovers" by Brett- Livingstone Strong, Depicts Michael and Lisa-Marie in a scene very reminscent of David Nordahl's "Camelot"

And speaking of Jackson art, on the heels of my previous piece about the new statue to be unveiled in China, I saw this article today.

The above painting, done in 1995, is credited to Brett Livingstone-Strong, the same artist who did “The Book.”



Anyway, “The Lovers”-like so many other possessions of Michael’s or items related to him-is set to go on ebay to be auctioned (for a pretty penny, I am sure!):

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/10/prweb4662254.htm

Excerpted from the above article:

“The Lovers” was inspired by John Waterhouses’s “Hylas and the Nymphs,” painted in 1897. The painting depicts a romantic couple, Jackson and Presley, surrounded by young fairy nymphs, in an enchanting forest lagoon filled with ferns and flowers. The painting depicts a moment in Greek mythology where Hylas is lured into the spring by the nymphs as showed by the nymph pulling Michael by the arm and into the spring. Jackson and Strong chose to create this painting due to Jackson’s own persona of peace and love as the scene in the painting is as Jackson saw himself in Greek mythology and immortality. What has been perceived as a controversial painting is in fact a magical and romantic masterpiece of such depths that few have understood until now.

It’s certainly a beautiful painting! However, I couldn’t help but note the striking similarities between this portrait and David Nordah’s “Camelot,” also commissioned in 1995, but never officially completed. (Michael wasn’t satisfied with the castle, and wanted it to be more “more fanciful,” according to Nordahl).

Here is a photo of Nordahl’s “Camelot”

You can see there is a striking similarity in the poses. In both paintings, Michael is pictured from above, leaning down to Lisa. Both paintings envoke the same romantic “knight in shining armor” scenario, but in different settings. Both paintings are depicted in mythic, “long ago and faraway” settings, reinforcing the idea of a “fairytale romance.” At first, I was highly suspicious that the two paintings bore so many similarities, but I know that Strong is a legit artist who had done other commissioned work for Michael, so those initial suspicions were immediatly put to rest. It is more likely that Michael simply had similar concepts for both paintings. But it’s interesting that they were both commissioned at approximately the same time, at the same juncture in his marriage to Lisa. I am wondering why this painting has not gotten more exposure before now. Is it possible that, as with “Camelot” it was never completed to Michael’s satisafaction? (And after all, would a layperson know the difference?). Was Michael playing with the idea of several mythical scenarios, trying to decide which he liked best? Did he prefer being a knight from Camelot, protector of his damsel? Or did he prefer to be Hylas, lured into the lagoon by his seductress? Both paintings, when compared, speak of an interesting duality in his relationship with Lisa. Perhaps his idea, when all was said and done, was to have both paintings as companion pieces, as a representation of that duality?

It’s an interesting theory, but no way to know for sure. I would love to hear from anyone who knows more about the history behind this painting.



On this webpage, linked to from the above article, it does offer up some interesting insights as to why Michael chose the image of Hylas:

Michael portrayed in Greek mythology

A little known fact is that this artwork is a modern day remake of the world renowned painting by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917) entitled “Hylas and the Nymphs” and painted in 1897. This scene has also been recreated by other artists, most notably by Henrietta Rae. You will find photos of both these works on this website. The painting depicts a moment in Greek mythology where Hylas is lured into the spring by the nymphs. Notice the nymph pulling Michael by the arm and into the spring. Michael and Brett chose to recreate this magical and mythical scene due to Michael’s own persona of peace and love. It is as if Michael saw himself in Greek mythology and immortality. What has been perceived to be a controversial painting is in fact a magical and romantic masterpiece of such depths few have understood until now.

A brief history about Hylas: In Greek mythology, beautiful youth. He was the son of Theiodamas, king of the Dryopes, and friend of Heracles. Heracles took him along on the Argonauts Expedition. When they reached the shores of Mysia, Hylas went ashore to find water. He found a spring, but the Nymphs of the water lured him into the deep. Hylas fell in love with the nymphs and remained with them to share in their powers.

http://www.thepassionportrait.com/





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