Katherine´s Wrongful Death Suit: The Tragedy It Reveals (Pt 2)



by Raven-Allforlove

November 14, 2010

In this installement, I’m going to take a look at the so called “Riot Act” meeting of June 18th, 2009-and what resulted from it.

Again, I will apologize for not being able to paste the document here. I am not set up to be able to cut and paste pdf documents. But I will try to be as accurate as possible in quoting from the document and referring you to specifc sections. You can view the document in its entirely here:
mjackson_wrongful_death

And as I said last time, it is important to keep in mind that the facts alleged in this document are just that-allegations. But as a picture of how Michael may have spent his last two weeks, it is indeed a harrowing one.

On page 7, #37, it basically outlines Murray’s job as making sure Michael Jackson got to rehearsals. “AEG threatened that if Jackson missed any further rehearsals, they were going to ‘pull the plug on the show,’ Jackson’s house, the doctor, and all the expenses for which they paid. (Granted, they would have been well within their rights to do so. But one can only imagine the added stress this must have put on Michael. With a schedule and demands so rigidly inflexible that even if he caught a cold, he might have been risking everything by not showing up, we can imagine the stress he was under-Raven's commentary). “…AEG said if they called off the tour, there would be lawsuits and Jackson’s career would be over. They said Jackson must work with Murray. They threatened there would be no further failures to perform on his part or everything with AEG was over.”

On page 7, #38, Lines 11-16, it says: “AEG told Murray that he had to make sure Jackson got to rehearsals. Unless Jackson got to rehearsals, the shows would be cancelled and Murray’s employment would be terminated.” (So, as you can see, Murray was under as much pressure as Michael to deliver-Raven's commentary). “It was Murray’s job to ensure Jackson was at rehearsals, and Murray was to attend rehearsals with Jackson.” (Why this was necessary, I have no idea. Perhaps to attend to his needs or any medical emergencies during the course of rehearsal-Raven's commentary). “they said it was to be ‘tough love’ and that they had read Jackson the ‘riot Act.’ Murray agreed to each of AEG’s demands. Murray thereafter attended rehearsals with Jackson.”

Apparently, things came to a head on June 18th, after Michael had missed some rehearsals. Earlier that day, at 1:11pm, Murray had received from AEG his written copy of their agreement, which specified among other things that Murray would receive all equipment necessary to do the job he had been hired for, including “Cardio-Pulmonary resuscitation equipment and a nurse.”

On page 8,#41, Lines 1-4, it states that AEG could fire Murray if he did not perform to their liking. “Murray was to perform the services as AEG directed, and Michael Jackson had no right to terminate the Agreement. It was AEG who directed, controlled, oversaw, and supervised Murray’s services.”

Also on June 18th, AEG conducted a meeting with Michael at his Carol Wood drive residence, at which point he was allegedly reprimmanded about the missed rehearsals and their suspicions that he was not adhering to their orders to stay away from Klein. The purpose of the Riot Act meeting appeared twofold: To stress upon Michael the importance of attending all reherasals (lest he lose everything he had put up for collateral and everything AEG was providing) and to make it very clear to him that he was NOT to go against Murray’s regimen.

Again, I think we have to look at how much AEG were within their rights, as co-partners in a business deal Michael had agreed to, and how much undue, inflexible pressure did they place upon him. That, of course, is the whole basis for the wrongful death suit. Did AEG behave negligently in taking advantage of someone in a vulnerable position and forcing Michael’s back to the wall?

From page 8, #43, Lines 10-16: “When Jackson got to the rehearsal at the Forum in Inglewood, California, on June 18th, 2009, at 9:30pm, a few hours after the “Riot Act” meeting, he was visibly shaken. He and his family depended on AEG’s continuing with the tour. He had no choice but to accept AEG’s dangerous demands or suffer the consequences. And he was in no condition to say no to AEG. Witnesses present at that rehearsal confirm that Michael was not himself that day.” (But who are these alleged witnesses? It doesn’t say. And are these “witnesses” long time friends or associates who would know the difference? Again, it doesn’t specify-Raven's commentary). From page 8, #44, Lines 15-16: “At AEG’s direction Murray went to the rehearsal that day to observe Jackson. Murray took directions from AEG, and he remained at the reherasal until AEG excused him.”

From page 8, #45, Lines 17-21: “Later on the evening of June 18th, 2009, Murray attended Jackson and gave him a cocktail of Valium, Ativan, Versed, and Propofol in order to get him to sleep. The ‘cocktail’ Murray provided was similar to the medications he had given Jackson for for the prior five (5) weeks, and Murray sought to make sure Jackson slept so he could attend rehearsals the next day. Murray administered Propofol without necessary resuscitation equipment and nursing support. (His requests for such had not been granted by AEG; however, that still does not excuse the fact that he proceeded to administer Propofol anyway, regardless. But again, it appears Murray was under just as much pressure from AEG as Michael, to do what had to be done, regardless-Raven's commentary).

From page 8, #46, Lines 22-24: Jackson appearded for rehearsals on June 19th, 2009, at the Forum. Murray was also present at rehearsals on June 19th, 2009, at AEG’s direction. Winesses confirm that Michael Jackson was upset, not coherent, and seemed drugged and disoriented.” (Again, no specific witnesses are named. However, if the reports are true, they all point to one culprit: Michael’s body was not tolerating Murray’s regimen. Most likely, it was the specific combination of drugs that were doing the damage-Raven's commentary).

From pages 8-9, #47, Lines 25-28 (p.8) and 1-4 (p. 9): “Jackson continued to receive treatments from Murray over the weekend (there were no rehearsals that weekend due to Father’s Day). When he appeared for rehearsal on June 23, 2009, Jackson was freezing cold. His assistants had to give him several shirts to wear under his long heavy coat. (In This Is It, we do almost always see him dressed in layers, even when rehearsing vigorously-Raven's commentary). Although it was warm in the Staples Center that day, and although the rehearsal was rigorous, Jackson had to have a heater. Jackson’s shivering and disorientation continued on June 24th, 2009, the last day before his death.” (This part I’m not sure whether to believe. It’s been well documented that Michael attended several business meetings that day, and appeared coherent and in good spirits. But it’s possible he could still have been suffering the effects of trying to follow a regimen that his body was rejecting-Raven's commentary). “AEG was well aware of his condition but did not postpone any rehearsals, nor did AEG relent in its demands that Jackson continue to maintain the grueling rehearsal schedule.”

From Page 9, #48, Lines 5-9: “On June 23, 2009, AEG forwarded by email a revised written copy of the AEG-Murray Agreement. On June 24th, 2009, Murray signed it and faxed it back to AEG. AEG still did nothing to provide Murray with Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation equipment, a nurse, or any other life-saving equipment necessary for the treatments he gave Jackson.”

From page 9, #49 (7 x 7!), Lines 10-11: “On June 25th, 2009, while under the influence of drugs administered by Murray, Michael Jackson died.”

Like I said, my purpose in sharing the document is not to pass any judgement, but to let you see what it alleges and judge for yourself. I do think Michael in his last weeks was a man with his back against the wall. If he did appear drugged and disoriented during this time, I think it was Murray’s regimen that was responsible. Michael was clearly not in a position to argue. It seems that everything really started to go downhill after the so-called Riot Act meeting. Perhaps AEG truly did think they were acting in the best interest of Michael and their investment. But the meeting clearly left Michael feeling shaken and paranoid. He obeyed AEG’s orders religiously from that point forward. But at what cost?





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